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Seen from space on the Atlantic coast, captured by Thomas Pesket

Seen from space on the Atlantic coast, captured by Thomas Pesket

This Thursday, July 22, the astronaut released a set of the entire southwest coast, ISS.

French astronaut Thomas Pesket, who is currently aboard the International Space Station (ISS), treats his followers on social media with photos of the Earth seen from space. This Thursday, July 22nd, he posted a feature on Facebook about the southern part of the Atlantic coast, from the coast of Gironde to the Basque Country, of course including Landus.

This photo brings together dozens of pictures taken from the dome of the station. “It’s easier to achieve a gallery than the others since I shot in almost a straight line from the Basque country in the south to the mouth of Gironde in the north,” explains the 43-year-old astronaut. It has been carrying out its second mission in orbit around our planet since April.

It was further felt that the assembly did not go completely to the tomb in the north, nor did it go exactly to the mouth of Adorin in the south. Nevertheless, he slips out of his spacecraft, saying “almost 250 km of fine sand is a dream,” which he shares with only three other astronauts as part of the alpha journey, which will last six months. Overall. Therefore, from current events, during these months of the summer tourist season, beaches that offer to find from an angle with at least original and unprecedented definition.

“Click to enlarge the details of these 65,535 high pixels !, Thomas Pesket calls. NB: This photo has exceeded the maximum number of pixels allowed by the JPG format… That’s when I finally broke the internet and Photoshop. “

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After returning from his first mission Proxima (November 2016 to June 2017), the French astronaut published a book with some of the most beautiful pictures taken from space.