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Apple News consumes a lot of memory

Apple News consumes a lot of memory

Currently there is an Apple News app, in which the group is increasingly providing comprehensive news, officially only in certain regions of the world, such as Great Britain, Australia, the United States and Canada. Nevertheless, many users in Europe use the software – it can be accessed on a Mac, iPhone or iPod by relocating the system to the appropriate country. However, if you use Apple Messages on a Mac, you need to focus on your storage and web resources: As more and more users are reporting, the app has recently been developed as a hard drive, SSD and bandwidth.

In the official Apple support forum This is said by the victimsThe application sometimes allows more than 60GB to go through the line without being heard. One person who checked this process with the help of an outgoing firewall found that within a few days an iMac had received 375GB. This is due to a daemon “News” process that is directly owned by Apple News and runs in the background. The data comes from Apple’s news servers, apple.news and c.apple.news.

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Downloads do not have to be on the hard drive or SSD, and cleaning seems to be the norm. Nevertheless, devices with smaller SSTs, such as the MacBook Air, are almost overcrowded. Users with block charges, for example via LTE, are particularly annoyed because Apple News will rob them of their bandwidth allocation. What exactly leads to behavior and what kind of data Apple News demands here was at first dark – but there seems to be a connection with iCloud. Behavior does not occur to all users.

According to information from 9to5Mac There is at least one workspace. It is unclear how long this will last. To do this, you need to go to the iCloud area in System Settings and disable Apple Message Sync via iCloud. You can also delete existing data here.


(B.Sc.)

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See also  Video conferencing, a definition - ZDNet