=

Hairstylist Tomihiro Kono uses 111 wigs to explore identity

Hairstylist Tomihiro Kono uses 111 wigs to explore identity

Written by Allyssia Alleyne, CNN

Like the clothes we choose and the faces we don’t choose, our hair (or lack thereof) is a key part of the story we tell without saying a word when we enter a room. Through the cut, the style and the color, our hair communicates a message about our values ​​and our circumstances, our heritage and our mood – whether we like it or not.

For those who just tell the same story for an extended period, one hairstyle will suffice. But for those looking to take on a dramatic new identity for just one night, or to test the waters before diving head first with a transformative haircut, there are wigs.

Photo taken from the book “Personas 111” by Tomihiro Kono, with makeup by Chiho Omae. Credit: Sayaka Maruyama

“There are limits to changing your hair because (we) have certain social roles, and it’s sometimes difficult to get too crazy and adventurous,” said Japanese hair stylist and wig maker Tomihiro Kono in an e- mail. “A wig can be an option to change instantly, without risk.”

Kono has been working with hair for 20 years, styling looks for Vogue, Dazed and W, among other magazines. But he only started creating wigs in 2017, as a way to expand his professional toolbox.

While his usual hairdressing job required the cooperation of a model or a client, the manufacture of wigs allowed him to give free rein to his imagination. No color is ever too bold, no cut too impractical. “Making wigs is like making a work of art as a hairdresser. I can create my imaginary characters,” he said.

Photo from the book

Photo taken from the book “Personas 111” by Tomihiro Kono, with makeup by Chiho Omae. Credit: Sayaka Maruyama

Kono has assembled a cast of these characters in his latest book, “Personas 111.” We see 111 wigs – designed in three years – in different states, first, like works of art, apparently floating in the air (an effect that reflects the interactive exhibitions that Kono organizes in Paris and Tokyo), then from behind, on the head of a mannequin. But it is only when we see them directly, modeled on androgynous photographer Cameron Lee Phan, that their transformative power becomes clear.

Photo from the book

Photo taken from the book “Personas 111” by Tomihiro Kono, with makeup by Chiho Omae. Credit: Sayaka Maruyama

While Phan’s stoic expression remains practically unchanged, a brown cup projects a different image than that of a set of blonde rollers or a crown of rainbow corkscrews.

Pink pearl and braided hair, swept forward in a wide bangs, evokes a delirium of the 90s; waves of black lacquered fingers, a silent movie star. Shaded pink and purple blown in a wispy halo and a shaggy mule suggest different riffs on rockstar, past and future – appropriate, given that Kono cites David Bowie, Blondie and the mod rock group from the 60s Small Faces as influences, long with the Japanese anime of the 80s and 90s and the natural world.

Photo from the book

Photo taken from the book “Personas 111” by Tomihiro Kono, with makeup by Chiho Omae. Credit: Sayaka Maruyama

In his essay for the book, Kono recalls the fact that wigs have long been part of the performing arts and implores readers to embrace them in their own personal narrative.

“Wigs help us to (experience) an instant transformation and to discover several characters that exist in us,” he writes.

“My wigs are artefacts to encourage and encourage continuous transformation. So ask who you want to be, choose your wig and enter your new life.”

“Personas 111” by Tomihiro Kono, published by Konomad, is now available.

source–>http://rss.cnn.com/~r/rss/edition_world/~3/zycdy1Hdl1c/index.html

Recommended For You

About the Author: Aygen

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

=